Posts Tagged ‘McKim’

Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #4 – Old King Cole

Mother Goose Quiltie #4

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-4-Old-King-Cole

Old King Cole was a merry old soul,

And a merry old soul was he;

He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers three.

Everyone loves Old King Cole. He is so jolly and fat and not like other kings at all. He loved to sit all sprawled out in his great chair, smoking his pipe as we see him, and maybe he has just called for his three fiddlers. Maybe too, he is kind of proud to think that he is King of all the Quilties.

Yay! One more reader participating in the Mother Goose quilt-a-long. Welcome, Mallika! Once everyone has a chance to finish, I hope to show photos of all the quilts. Here’s my doll-sized square for this week.

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-square-4

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Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #3 – Jack and Jill

I’m really excited that several readers are stitching along with me — Patty and Robin are making their blocks 6″, while Cathy is following the original instructions, and making her blocks 10″.

Here is Mother Goose Quiltie #3

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-3-Jack-and-Jill

Jack and Jill went up the hill

To fetch a pail of water;

Jack fell down and broke his crown,

And Jill came tumbling after.

Jack and Jill! They did not do anything so wonderful, yet ‘most every child in the country knows about them. They are about the best loved of all Mother Goose’s children; but it must take a lot of loving to make up for a broken head. This Quiltie picture is on the way up, before they got all tumbled. You would not want them after the spill, ’cause they would not look so tidy.

Are you saving each block carefully?

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Here is my doll-sized Jack and Jill block, which I made with my own little chubby hands.

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-square-3

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Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #2 – The Old Lady Who Lived in a Shoe

This was one of my favorite nursery rhymes when I was little (and still is). I loved imagining living in a shoe with all those siblings, and I always enjoyed looking at the variety of ways the illustrators interpreted the shoe house. I know there are people who have a problem with this particular rhyme, and some have even created new politically correct lines to replace the two about broth and spanking. I still like the original version, though, and it’s the one I taught to my children, just as my mother taught it to me. The explanation under the pattern (as to why the Old Lady is so cranky), is pretty funny.

Mother Goose Quiltie Number 2

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-2-Old-Woman-Lived-Shoe

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.

She had so many children she didn’t know what to do;

So she gave them some broth without any bread

And spanked them all soundly and sent them to bed.

The Old Woman who lives in a shoe seems kind of cranky, but you must remember she has a lot more children than the two we see. And, having to live in a shoe is enough to make anyone cross. But she will soon have them all spanked and put to bed, and then she will be as jolly as the rest of the Quilties.

This is the second Quiltie, which is going into the pretty Mother Goose Quilt that you are all going to make, and maybe win one of the gold prizes, which are going to be given for the best quilts, as explained last week.

Here are the first two blocks for my doll quilt.

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-square-1

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-square-2

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Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern – Ruby Short McKim, 1920

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle published this McKim series in their children’s section, The Junior Eagle. I hadn’t realized they were originally meant to be made by children, and I love that the Eagle went beyond just publishing the patterns, and sponsored a contest for the little quilt-makers (prizes listed below).

Today we have a drawing of the finished quilt, along with instructions, as well as the first Quiltie in the series — Mother Goose, of course. I wanted to start on a Sunday (just like the Eagle), but I’m a little late. From now on, I will publish each new pattern on successive Sundays, and I hope some of you will stitch along with me. I am thinking of making mine doll sized, but I haven’t quite made up my mind. [Update: I am doing a doll quilt with 4″ finished blocks, and back stitch instead of the suggested outline stitch, because it’s easier to make sharp corners] Click the images to enlarge.

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-the-quilt-itself

Here is the cunning little quilt we have been telling about, all finished to tuck around the boys and girls who love Mother Goose’s family. See Jack and Jill going for that troublesome pail of water. And can you find stupid, old Humpty Dumpty that fell clear off the wall. Who has jumped right over the candlestick?

Every Sunday, for twenty weeks, one of the little blocks, or Quilties, will be here, just the size to transfer on to a 10-inch muslin square. Be sure to save every pattern, because it takes just twenty for a quilt to fit your bed.

After they are traced through carbon paper onto muslin, big sister or mother can show you about the outline stitch, if you never did it. Use some pretty colored thread, and when the Quilties are all finished they can be set together with strips of the same color. Sure, boys make quilts too, and get tucked under them just the same as girls do.

Of course, you are all going to make one of these Quilts and try for one of the prizes. Read all about them below.

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-prizes

The First Pattern – Mother Goose Quiltie No. 1

Mother-Goose-Quiltie-1-Mother-Goose

Old Mother Goose now leads the way

For all her funny folks to play;

She’ll have a party, just for you,

If careful stitching you can do.

Here is Mother Goose, just as we promised, flying up to sweep the cobwebs out of the sky. The Man in the Moon is watching to see that she does a good job. By morning she’ll be all through and come sweep the cobwebs out of kiddie’s sleepy eyes in time to see the big, bright sun.

Note — To change the drawing into a quilt block, get a smoothly ironed piece of muslin, 10 inches square and a blue or black carbon paper. Lay the muslin down on a flat surface. Place the carbon paper over it. On top of the carbon paper place the above drawing. Stick rows of pins around the design so it will be held firmly in place over the carbon and the muslin. Then, so that the traced lines of the design will be perfectly straight, lay a ruler along the lines of the drawing. Trace over the lines of the drawing and the pattern will be transferred through the carbon to the muslin. Then you can outline stitch the lines on the muslin and have the pattern in thread. There are twenty drawings in all, so when the series is completed you will have enough muslin squares to make a child’s quilt.

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