Search for ‘quiltie’ returned 19 result(s)

Mother Goose Quiltie #20   Little Jack Horner sat in a corner, Eating his Christmas pie; He stuck in his thumb and pulled out a plum, And said, “What a smart boy am I.” Here we are to the very last corner and Little Jack Horner to sit in it. If you enjoy this apread…

Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #19   Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater, Had a wife and couldn’t keep her; Put her in a pumpkin shell And there he kept her very well. Perhaps you never knew before how Peter Peter kept his wife in a pumpkin. Pumpkins aren’t big enough for houses, but this was a very…

Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #18   The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, All on a summer’s day; The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, And took them all away. You would think any one would be good to the Queen of Hearts, she is so pretty and sweet. But the tarts that…

Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #17   Little Boy Blue, Come blow your horn. The sheep’s in the meadow, The cow’s in the corn. And first thing you know, the cow and the sheep will be marching all over this quilt, and then how will it look? But there, Little Boy Blue is blowing his horn,…

When I was little and sang this song to my baby brother, I imagined the cradle was hung on a very low branch, just inches above the ground (ignoring the words “tree top”), because otherwise the baby was going to be horribly injured. Wikipedia’s explanations were not entirely satisfying. Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #16 Rock-a-bye…

This was not one of my favorite rhymes when I was little, because I felt sad for Old Mother Hubbard and her dog. It was hard for me to imagine having no food in your cupboard, not even a bone for your poor dog. Note:  In Sharrie’s comment below, she points out that there are additional verses that are…

I was not familiar with this nursery rhyme, so when I saw the illustration, I assumed it was “Rub-a-dub-dub, three men in a tub.” Wikipedia has an interesting article about the history of this rhyme, and the connection between New York City and the “Gotham City” of Batman fame. One of the wise men looks like he…

Each week I marvel at the way Ruby McKim manages to add so much detail to these illustrations, using only vertical, horizontal and diagonal lines. This Bo-Peep design is one of my favorites — I love her hat with the ribbon, her staff, and her little snood. With just a few well-placed lines, you can…

Finally caught up, and now I’m more than halfway done stitching my 20 blocks. I’m not going to sew any more squares into the quilt until they’re all done, just in case I decide to change their placement in the pattern. Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #12 Jack be nimble, Jack be quick; Jack jum over…

After almost 7 years, my blog theme was very out-of-date, and the same theme was no longer available. My son spent hours transferring my blog to a new theme, and now I have been revisiting all my older posts to tweak the images where the formatting changed a bit. The categories on the sidebar will be…

Since it was discovered that blankets should no longer be used to cover baby in her crib, she needs cozy sleepwear for cool nights. Bunting is back, baby! Mother Goose Quiltie Pattern #9   Bye, Baby Bunting, Daddy’s gone a hunting, For to get a ribbit’s skin, To wrap the Baby Bunting in. Baby Bunting is…

According to Wikipedia: A tuffet, pouffe or hassock is a piece of furniture used as a footstool or low seat. It is distinguished from a stool in that it is completely covered in cloth so that no legs are visible, and is essentially a large hard cushion that may have an internal wooden frame to…

Dyspeptic — now that’s a word you don’t hear much anymore, and certainly not one you would normally read in an article intended for children. It does seem to be a good description of Mr. Sprat, however, since it means irritability brought on by indigestion. I think I would be irritable, too, if I never…

It’s interesting that Ruby McKim decided to use the third verse of the Simple Simon rhyme for this quilt. She also used it a decade later in her Rhyme Land quilt (pattern available here). Many children are probably familiar with the first two verses, having to do with the Pie Man, but this verse is less well known.…

It’s interesting to read the little comments under each nursery rhyme. The author must have been either Ruby Short McKim or a McKim Studios employee, because I’ve found the same text in several different newspapers. Of course the comments are old-fashioned, and some are a little odd  — maybe due to the recently introduced “scientific” theory of raising children. Mother…