Posts Written On June 2013

Poster Picture Book to color — Peter Mabie, 1934

This is a wonderful old coloring book that I’ve been wanting to share for some time.  Unfortunately, all but a few of the 96 pages have been colored with crayon, so each illustration requires a cleanup in Photoshop.  I shouldn’t complain, because I’m amazed that these books survive at all as the newsprint type paper becomes very brittle with age.  The cover of this book is unusual in that it’s paper covered heavy cardboard — sort of a lightweight hardback book.

Normally I try to avoid purchasing used coloring books, but Peter Mabie is one of my all-time favorite illustrators, and, although I have several other Mabie books, this is my only coloring book.  I love the simple designs with only one picture on each page, and think they would be perfect for embroidery on toddler clothing or for quilt blocks.  Of course, you could also use them as they were intended, and print them out for children to color.  Click thumbnails to enlarge.

A big thank you to all of the people who have managed to save the old books, quilt patterns, and embroidery transfers that I love.

Poster Picture Book to color
Peter Mabie, illustrator
Whitman Publishing, 1934

Picture-Poster-Book-1934-cover

 



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Friendship Knot Quilt Blocks

Over the past couple of months, I have been working on several different quilts, including Seven Sisters, Triangle, Grandmother’s Flower Garden Star and these Friendship Knot quilt blocks. I wrote a post about this pattern in 2010 when I only had one block finished — now there are five. That works out to be about one block every eight months or so, but I actually made the four new blocks in the past two weeks.

Every few months I get an inquiry about this pattern, which was published in Quilter’s Newsletter in April, 1984, as part of a series on scrap quilts.  I pretty much copied the QN quilt design, because I loved the look of the scrappy curved pieces next to the lighter background prints — my quilts usually have more solid spaces.  Something else different about these blocks is that they contain a lot of new fabric, including the solid red and red print diamonds, as well as the background fabric.  All of the multicolored prints are vintage Double Wedding Ring pieces (big fat ones), re-cut to fit this pattern.  My blocks are 15″ and are hand pieced.

UPDATE 7/2014:  I have added the second page of templates.  Click on each instruction page until images are enlarged to full size. Right-click on an image to save to your computer. Open the .jpg file and instruct your printer to scale the image to fit an 8 1/2″ x 11″ letter-sized piece of paper.  Your G square should print at 2″, and on the second page, the longest straight side of the E piece should be 4 3/8 “.  This will make a 15” block.

Friendship-Knot-block-2

Friendship-Knot-block-3

Friendship-Knot-block-4

Friendship-Knot-block-1

Friendship-Knot-block-5

Friendship-Knot-2

 

Friendship-Knot-Variation-2



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Alice in Wonderland Painting Book — Quilt Block #7

Here’s the latest block stitched from my old painting book published by Platt and Munk Co. It took a long time to complete this block because I’ve only been working on it sporadically.  I’m more than halfway done, with five more blocks to stitch, and I still have no idea how I’m going to put the blocks together. I think I’ll have to wait until they’re all done before I decide.

The blocks are 6″ x 9 3/4″ (the same size as the painting book pages), and the embroidery was done with stem stitch using one strand of DMC 498 floss on the same vintage sheet, even though the background colors in my photos all look a little different.
Alice-Quilt-Block-7

Here are the previously stitched blocks, and below that are all of the restored original pages which were in bad shape, most pages having been both painted and colored with crayon.



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